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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 57 (some duplicates have been removed)
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> ifill: a pennsylvania judge blocked a new law that would have required voters to show photo i.d. at the polls next month. good evening. i'm gwen ifill. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the newshour tonight, ray suarez examines how the debate over voting rights and election year fraud is playing out around the country. >> ifill: then, we have two takes on the battle for north carolina. jeffrey brown reports on the tightening presidential contest. >> brown: barack obama won this state in 2008 by the slimmest of margins with help from a large african-american turnout. four years later in a down economy it looks like his challenge will be even greater. >> woodruff: and we talk with national public radio's greg allen. he focuses on the outreach to hispanics in the tar heel state. >> ifill: then margaret warner updates the investigation into the assault on the u.s. consulate in libya. >> woodruff: we look at new findings showing australia's great barrier reef has lost half its coral in the last 27 years. >> ifill: and we close wi
of the supreme court, certainly intellect, experience, obs vance of the rule of law and precedent. but the supreme court is the final word of what is the law of the land and so therefore i don't want to see more who say that discrimination against women and discrimination based on gender is not protected against under the constitution. when i go by the supreme court on my way to work every day over the mantle it says equal justice under law. it does not say equal justice for some people in america and not for others. and as it relates to row v. wade, i support that. i support a woman's right to choose. my opponent i don't know which view he has. last year he was prolife, now he's pro-choice. >> senator business and industry complain that the 2010 fair act will be expensive and cut into profits and slow the economic recovery. how do you respond to critics who argue that the economic burden of implementing this policy will wind up costing even more american jobs? >> first of all, the reality is what did he have before the law, double premium increases, unsustainable for a family who
in the nation. we pass the combating autism into law, critical for those families. iran is a national security threat to the united states and allies in israel. i joined at the republican senator from illinois was passed in most crippling sanctions by one company against another and got a 100 [cheers and applause] zero vote in the united states senate, something you don't see too often. working with republican senator, chair of the housing subcommittee, we pass into law doubling housing. those are three of many examples i can. for i have worked with republican senators on the other site to make a difference for new jersey families. talking about bipartisan all-time, 90% of these those durand line with his party in the state legislature. every time his colleagues want to seek an override, he has never found once an opportunity to join them and say no. >> moderator: michael aron at the next question to senator menendez. >> senator menendez can the team to snipe at each other all the time. you seem to have a chilly relationship with governor christie dating back to 2006 when you were the target o
conservative court but that he'll do it gradually. >> he's not trying to move the law radically quickly. i think, justice scalia, or justice thomas really want to get to the end answer as quickly as possible, and make the law conform to what they really understand. whereas the chief justice is more incrementallist. >> reporter: but conservative court watcher carrie severino doesn't believe much will change any time soon. >> certainly this is not a crusading conservative court, until we have a shift, i think in the membership of the court it's impossible to call it a court that leans more to the left or to the right. >> reporter: for the opinions that could be close 5-4 decisions, attention will also be paid to justice anthony kennedy, who's frequently the swing vote in some of the toughest cases. >> joe johns the for us in washington. >>> a tennessee house fire leaves two grandparents dead, and there's no sign of two kids who were staying at the home. it's been a week and investigators are getting desperate. improve the health of your skin with aveeno daily moisturizing lotion. the natural
ahead, why is the obama administration telling companies to break the law? how can the president justify this? making matters worse, the president is promising to pay the legal bills of the companies breaking the law with, you guessed it, taxpayer money. this story is likely to unglue you. former governor haley barbour is outraged. he's here and next. also you must hear what these two men are saying. senator john mccain and governogovernor chris christie. could the obama secret weapon be used against them? a new twist that will you have talking. stick around. nnouncer ] how do u make 70,000 trades a second... ♪ reach one customer at a time? ♪ or help doctors turn billions of bytes of shared information... ♪ into a fifth anniversary of remission? ♪ whatever your business challenge, dell has the technology and services to help you solve it. droid does. and does it launch apps by voice while learning your voice ? launch cab4me. droid does. keep left at the fork. does it do turn-by-turn navigation ? droid does. with verizon, america's largest 4g lte network, and motorola, droid does.
in the united states they have to meet the requirements of many different countries laws, and sometimes it is difficult to become a supplier to a high brand-name a anchor tenant because they don't want to have their brand integrity challenge door product challenge and they are trying to deliver the best product at the best point possible to get more market share and global dominance. so when we talk of a trusted suppliers that one set of suppliers and that's another set of getting into the to process these are both very important. >> dennis was speaking from mississippi in case you couldn't tell from my accent. when you're eating cat fish you don't know if it came from the delta or the vietnam. the food source is truly global but with extending that to deny what you just a little bit further we do have the food and drug administration, the united states department of agriculture regulations, and so to extend your analogy is there a role for regulation in cyberspace? what are the proper roles as melissa mentioned the policy levers to read this is to each of the panelists. >> as i said at
see. here with it is cnn's kyon law. >>> dinner time means family time at the skillman household, from who is chopping to who's stirring. to who's sitting around the table and who soon won't. how hard is this for your family? >> not real sure. i don't think it's hit them yet. i really don't. >> reporter: a grandfather to three girls, his other title is master sergeant dan skillman, u.s. army reserves. he deploys to afghanistan in weeks, with his wife, master sergeant lola skillman and their oldest son, james, a sergeant. husband, wife, and son will be gone nine months as reserve support at kandahar. despite the 29 years that lola served, this will be her first time deployed to a war zone. are you scared at all? >> yes. some people say no, they're not scared, they're ready to go do this. but i think in the back of everybody's mind it is a little bit terrifying. >> reporter: at the skillman home where the unpaved road meets a montana big sky, they know about sacrifice for country. lola's father was awarded the purple heart during world war ii. dan's father joined the national guard. dan
, that's what we did. [applause] the new health care law helps make sure you don't have to worry about going broke just because you or a loved one gets sick. insurance companies can no longer put lifetime limits on your care. or jack up your premiums without reason. or drop your coverage when you need it most. they can no longer discriminate against children with pre-existing conditions. and soon they will no longer be able to deny you coverage based on pre-existing conditions like breast cancer or charge you more for the same care just because you're a woman. this law has already allowed nearly seven million young adults under the age of 26 to sign up and stay on their parents' health care plan. it's already saved millions of seniors on medicare hundreds of dollars on their prescription medicine. and millions of americans have actually gotten a rebate from their insurance company if that company -- you got one? [applause] i wanted to say -- i mean, she was a supporter. but i didn't know about -- [laughter] you get a rebate if the insurance company spent too much on demitch costs and c
has just enumerated, but also because the world has changed around us. in part because the laws our policy. we spent an awful lot of time, effort and money after world war ii creating an international system, economic system in particular to stimulate the growth in the rest of the world. so, this is the success of the policy of several decades that has made us relatively less strong in terms of disposable cash and disposable incentives to get to the behavior that we want to see. militarily, we surely are as strong as we have ever been, but we live in a world that has a number of nuclear powers and we still live in the world before 1957 that had not. so, other than us. you know, to me it hardly even seems worth debating this is a different world. >> i was told we have to debate. [inaudible] the decline is the wrong word. i think the world is getting more crowded. they are growing faster and in economic terms the u.s. will have the west shared wealth for the years ahead but there isn't a country by the way that is as jessica said that is a story of american success. it's for 60 years
international order that upholds the rule of law, of open access to all domains, and of the peaceful resolution of disputes. we seek a peaceful asia-pacific region where all the states of the region, all of them, can enjoy the benefits of security and continue to prosper just as they have for almost 70 years, since the valiant efforts of the brave men and women who fought so courageously in world war ii. indeed, part of the reason states in the region have been able to prosper has been due to our military presence. thanks to that historic security, states in the region have had the freedom to choose and forge their own economic and political futures. the stability provided an important measure by the united states military presence in the region helped, first, japan and south korea to rise and prosper, then southeast asia to rise and prosper, and now, yes, china and in a different way, india, to rise and prosper. working with all of them, we intend to continue to play that positive, pivotal stabilizing role. that's what the rebalance is all about. to those who ask whether we'll be able to deliv
beaten to death. was written cabin" very much as a protest novel to the fugitive a state law or anyone in the north, including new england, with the abolitionists and -- if anyone in the northwest to aid or abet a fugitive slave, they themselves would be imprisoned or fine for breaking the law. this was seen as a compromise between the north and south to avoid war. that was part of what the novel was trying to do, to say, listen, i am a person, harriet beecher stowe, and i'm against slavery, as was much of new england, and i just my right to call a slave who finds him or herself -- t.s. my right to help the slave who finds him or herself within our borders. >> more about it. beecher stowe this weekend as -- or about. beecher stowe this weekend as we look behind the history and literary history of augusta, maine. sunday at 5:00 p.m. on american history tv on c-span3. >> almost 20 years ago, we broadcast one of the most controversial stories in our 44 years on the air. it was called "yes, but is it art?" at was accused of being a philistines, someone without the ability to appreciate con
the law. um, and if you do that in this case, there is no reasonable justification for a continuation of the exclusivity ban. so i think, i think the chairman's order, um, as you describe it, um, is the appropriate course of action to take. um, you know, are -- and that's been comcast's position in the proceeding. um, life is long. as you note, our order lasts until 2018. um, and so for whatever it applies to over that period of time, it applies to. but after that period of time we should be treated like everybody else, um, and again if, um, if people believe that it is appropriate for the exclusivity ban to continue, they need to go back to congress and to get different legislation than the legislation that exists now. because the current legislation simply does not support the exclusivity ban in the current competitive positive -- posture of the marketplace. >> what happens when october 5th rolls around and it expires? do we suddenly see several exclusive contracts out there? >> guest: i don't think so. i think the fears have been overstated. i think that the marketplace now is such
to focus on the constitution and the rule of law because the legal framework is such that women are protected in the constitution in terms of their right. any move away from the rule of law, where trade was just as our ad hoc justices applied is bad for women. we have seen that in parts of afghanistan. the reality is that it's going to be pretty difficult for women in hearts of afghanistan because as you see in pakistan, pakistan does have the rule of law, an institution, but in the remote parts you can't always enforce it. and that is going to be the reality for a lot of women in parts of afghanistan. and i think we are pretty powerless to do much about that. but what we can try and do is try and make sure that women's rights are enshrined in the comp duchenne for interrogation from that and influence. we can use our influence because if we found the afghans come obvious they were going to make it conditional on things like corruption and human rights, on how women are treated. so we have this going to give the minister of finance to do the right thing. so i think we should use
laws, the ban on the xl pipeline, the enforcement of labor laws -- those policies have killed thousands and thousands of jobs and collectively, we are making it incredibly difficult for small businesses to drive, much less -- thrive, much less survive. >> so if you have 65% of spending going to individual payments, what would you do to try to reduce that? >> in order to create more jobs, we have to control the national debt. i think that is what we have to do. i have said it from the beginning. i have given a plan to try to deal with it. this idea that somehow mr. cruz is lecturing us on standing on our own feet, i find incredible. he spent most of your adult life working for the government. you have not created jobs. you have not on your own business. i have. my wife and i own a retail store. we did not have the federal government with their boots on our neck. when george bush was president, we lost 700,000 jobs per month. all these programs were in place at the time. the only addition is the health care act, which has not been fully implemented. i think that you have a selective memor
in federal court if bin laden was captured. the book said he felt dew processs and the rule of law would be the best weapon against al-qaida. >> gretchen: the world's largest generic drug maker pulling the drug antidepressant from a storage shelve. wellbuttrin. it doesn't work like it is supposed to. they found wharf it is. it released. okay it releases faster than the original drug in 2008. federal officials said the two were. now you know why i am not a pharmacist. >> brian: plus you hate the cotton balls. >> gretchen: i do. >> brian: how could a christian bible house not religious. they asked for a exemption of the controversial birth. tyndale house said the ma date violates the beliefs. he said 95 percent of the profits go to non. >> steve: it is the laziest invention ever. the hop and suitcase that follows you around. using the blue tooth signal on your cell phone. fine as long as someone doesn't use yourr cell phone. if it is lost, the bag locks itself and alert the owner's phone. the 28 year old who came up with the idea said it is not ready for the market. >> gretchen: looks like
spying. you have the law of the land in the united states. for the chinese, it is an attractive alternative. when you are on the other side of the trade and you know your competitor or the person you buy something from us under pressure financially, you should hold the card and send a card. so you just don't want to get to a point where the chinese say, look, we will do this, but we want much higher interest rates. so that is when race could spike, really impact the economy, be much costlier for average folks because rates will follow suit and will see a spiraling out of control now. so that is why you just don't want to have some other player having cars like that. in addition, you need economic growth in terms of raising revenue before this country. we are seeing growth contracts. that's okay, but it's just okay. it is not where we should meet in this kind of recovery, at this moment in the recovery based on typical recovery. next year as a result of going over the fiscal cliff and that of course is the expiration of the tax cuts to the spending programs for the most economist
by that is one of the reasons many of these voter i.d. laws were passed is they did not understand the implications on the state level. so many people were outraged with the trayvon martin killing, but the district attorney decided not to press charges was elected. most of the issues that affect people every day our local issues, but i believe that national organizations put so much emphasis on the top of the ticket they are ignoring vital state, gubernatorial, state, county commissioner, all those down-ballot races, and when you are talking about the military- industrial complex, those are district attorney's charging people, judge-citizens charging people, so speak to how you are educating your constituents to understand down-ballot races matter, and even more so, then the top of the ticket? >> it is also different states. if you complained about extremism in the republican party or the support by minorities of the democratic party, you self-gerrymander the country, counties, and districts. what is transpiring is you can make sure you -- but you are giving up on south carolina. t
neighborhood. now we just had to wait for law enforcement to arrive. you know who is coming on to me now? you know the kind of guys that do reverse mortgage commercials? those types are coming on to me all the time now. (vo) she gets the comedians laughing and the thinkers thinking. >>ok, so there's wiggle room in the ten commandments, that's what you're saying. you would rather deal with ahmadinejad than me. >>absolutely. >> and so would mitt romney. (vo) she's joy behar. >>and the best part is that current will let me say anything. what the hell were they thinking? [ nervous ] i hope no one recognizes us... you...you think these disguises will... no. [ male announcer ] salty. sweet. and impossible to resist. septic disasters are disgusting and costly, but avoidable. the rid-x septic subscriber program helps prevent backups by sending you monthly doses right to your door so you will never forget to maintain your system. sign up at rid-x.com. >> there are a lot of people in this country who need organ transplants, 115,000 people every year need transplants. 18 people die eve
free. governor jerry brown giving the okay to a law that can release them. >> gregg: shocking numbers, u.s. airlines raked in $2 billion in baggage ties during the first half of the year. that the largest amount ever collected for a six-month period. this as a new report emerges finding passengers are facing more fees than ever before and fewer choices. how about that? anything consumers can do. ed joins us managing partner of investment firm. rise of oil prices make a corresponding rise in jet fuel and 30% of operating costs for the airlines. are the airlines trying to make up for it in other ways like the fees? >> sure. look this is great lesson in economics. it's supply and demand and competition. when there is less competition. usually the quality goes down and prices go up. that is exactly what is happening right now. we have fewer and fewer airlines out there. you have oil prices, gregg, any time oil prices are above $85 a barrel you have a hard time being profitable in the airline industry. >> gregg: that is the tipping point generally? >> it really is. so is this a sign of thi
health care law last june. so how might mitt romney change the high court if he becomes president of the united states? he's already giving all of us some major clues. let's bring in cnn's crime and justice correspondent joe johns who's taking a closer look. what are you seeing? >> the supreme court doesn't get talked about that much on the campaign trail. but choosing a justice is one of the most important things a president does. it's how on administration puts its mark on some of the nation east toughest, most divisive issues. and we have a look at how mitt romney might handle it if he's president. whenever mitt romney fielded questions during the primaries about his picks for the supreme court, he was armed with a stock republican answer. >> what i would look to do would be to appoint people to the supreme court that will follow strictly the constitution as opposed to to legislating from the bench. >> reporter: but he wouldn't choose a favorite. >> would you pick one, please? >> yes, roberts, thomas, alito and scalia. >> reporter: all that changed in june when roberts cast the
ways to reduce the number of abortions. we got to think about why our law enforcement community --our working mothers are in trouble. we have to get free natal care for them. have too many children coming into kindergarten behind, and if we lose them in kindergarten, we lose them for ever. 2500 kids in a program here in omaha that are provided refuge that are being sexually abused in their own home. we got to pay attention to them, and we got to help them and the moms and the community leaders who are trying to help this problem. i do not think we should regulate women in making these decisions. it does not stop there. there is lots more that needs to make sure that that children have a fair and decent opportunity to live to their full potential. >> i am pro life. i believe in the sanctity of life. i believe there should be an exception made for the life of the mother. what we are looking at is an economy that is hurting families. we're looking at an economy that tends to hurt women more. the situation we're in the last four years, it is hurting women. women are not able to find jobs.
and brother-in-law. they live right over the border in boston. i do not know if that is a good or bad thing to everybody here. my sister lives in boston. she works for dunkin brands. this man knows how to balance a budget, cut spending, it knows fiscal responsibility. he is one of the leaders helping us to do that. that is charlie bass as well. let's give them a round of applause. [applause] friends, we have a big trees to make. -- we have a big choice to make. this is not your ordinary election. we are not just deciding who will be the next president for four years. we are deciding what kind of country we will have and what kind of people we will be for a generation. this is a high-stakes election. if we have four more years like the last four years, we continue stagnation. the choice is very clear. do we want a dynamic, growing economy that fosters opportunity or do we want a stagnant economy that fosters dependency? that is not who we are. we want to live free and prosper. we want to believe. [applause] when president obama came into office, he inherited a tough situation. the problem is
to himself. with that adjudication under federal law, it prohibits you from buying a gun, but in virginia 2007, those records are only sent to a background check if you are sent for inpatient therapy. cho was sent to outpatient therapy, so that connection with never made. instead of signing up for therapy, he went on the internet and bought some guns and ammunition and walked into this building a couple months after that and killed 32 people and himself. >> professor geobotany -- giovanni a few years before that threaten to leave if something was not done. >> to raise the flag of his peers, other people that live on the campus, students, why was he never dealt with appropriately, why was he not given help you so badly asking for? hindsight is 2020 in retrospect, but if you learn something, you have to change. you cannot let this same situation happened somewhere else. >> now, aurora massacre victims are coming to meet with you? >> yes, and it has happened again. obviously, a young person that should never have had guns in his hands in the first place. we will learn more about this particu
don't understand where that law came from, i thought a majority is anything that's above 50%, and i don't know where this 60% came from. maybe you could enlighten us on exactly the origin of that filibuster law. host: well, andy, that would take way too long for me to explain, but perhaps we'll do that as a segment on the "washington journal" and take our viewers and listeners through the intricacies of the rules of the house and senate. but thanks for your call. we're going to move on to ron on our line for democrats, calling from florida. good morning, ron. caller: good morning. host: ron, divided party -- one party or divided government? caller: well, that question is -- the underlying point is you're saying a -- in essence, what you're saying is a one-party state, and that just doesn't work. it was proved in the soviet union and the place where i immigrated from, which was cuba. the problem is, as someone said, this is not your father's republican party. when you have a new crop signing a pledge before they even take office that allows them no room to negotiate, on top of that,
treatments are given. that's explicitly prohibited in the law. but let's go back to what governor romney indicated, that under his plan he would be able to cover people with pre-existing conditions. well, actually, governor, that isn't what your plan does. what your plan does is to duplicate what's already the law, which says if you are out of health insurance for three months then you can end up getting continuous coverage and an insurance company can't deny you if it's been under 90 days. but that's already the law, and that doesn't help the millions of people out there with pre-existing conditions. there's a reason why governor romney set up the plan that he did in massachusetts. it wasn't a government takeover of health care. it was the largest expansion of private insurance. but what it does say is that insurers, you've got to take everybody. now, that also means that you've got more customers. but when governor romney says that he'll replace it with something but can't detail how it will be in fact replaced and the reason he set up the system he did in massachusetts is because ther
what treatments are given. that's explicitly prohibited in the law. but let's go back to what governor romney indicated, that under his plan, he would be able to cover people with pre- existing conditions. that isn't what your plan does. what your plan does is to duplicate what's already the law, which is that if you are out of health insurance for three months, then you can end up in getting continuous coverage and an insurance company can deny you if it's been under 90 days. -- cannot deny you if it's been under 90 days. but that's already the law, and that doesn't help them and the people out there with preexisting editions. -- the millions of people out there with preexisting conditions. there's a reason why governor romney set up the plan he did in massachusetts. it wasn't a government takeover of health care. it was the largest expansion of private insurance. but what it does say is that, insurers, you've got to take everybody. that also means you've got more customers. but when governor romney says he'll replace it with something but cannot detail how it will be replaced and the
it in a warm and empathetic way. and president obama did a little bit of that but in this very disengaged law/professor-type of approach. some people think it is harder for the president to be nasty, be tough because then he comes across as an angry black man who is going to scare people. i don't know, but for whatever reason it -- he just did not push back. he did not engage. >> i think also the lack of audience noise was an issue and the way the debate was staged. it added to this lack of energy. remember, this is a year when most people watching debates on television or getting their news are used to the kind of roar of the crowd. they used to tweet, they are used to crowd engagement. to have two people quiet ligating on the stage in a professorial way is quite alien for most american people today. >> there's that same perception that it is reality, even liberal pundits were critical of the president. a lot of the post and headlines today will say mitt romney won this debate. they are both going out on the road today, they are back in campaign mode, there's another vice presidential debate
their own military law reviews show ptsd and substance abuse-related misconduct are close the related, that there is a nexus that one comes from the other. what we are addressing -- we're not asking the military to not have people held accountable for misconduct. if you need to punish someone because they illegally or in violation of regulation of used the illegal substances, go ahead and punish them within the system, but that does not mean you up to go to the extent of imposing administrative sanctions that have an impact on the rest of their life such as taking away all their benefits and then putting a person without a safety net out into the community where they then become a problem in my community. and all they do is end of draining the resources of my community. and that can be within the criminal justice system, homelessness, domestic violence, child abuse, and the list goes on and on and on. there needs to be when it comes to addressing the issue of stigma, their knees to really be a revamping of -- there needs to be a revamping of how the ministration the ministers the puni
talking about their legal rights and i am sure there are some law students in the room. when you read the book and the legal documents about the declaration, you understand about legal advice and international, finding, legal rights to jews and the rights to the land. i call this the common sense rights. [inaudible] this side was aggressive and started the war in and saying, you know, above my land back, -- even in the united states, nobody comes and tells you that we want our land back after we lost the war. the common sense rights should be something that should be said straightly. it enables us to espouse another role. [inaudible] if you lose, you lose. i've been talking about the rights about something very important, many times because of the pressure, coming from washington and the u.s., we tend not to speak about what belongs to us and what we believe, and i chose the name of the book "isreal: the will to prevail" because i think it is all about us. if we have the will to live, the will and the courage of the nation, we would be able to prevail. if we would try to satisfy every
the first thing you have to do is let all of the 2001-2003 tax laws sunset. go away. that's a tax increase, most of which the president wouldn't support. then you have to cut by $5 trillion. so compared to where we are now it's a much smaller reduction in tax revenue which makes it easier to fill the revenue hole and we have five studies, one from martin feldstein, one from the tax foundation, one from the american enterprise institute, we have studies that show there are plans that meet the governor's goal, cut rates 20% across the board, don't lose revenue and make sure the rich pay their fair share of taxes so it can be done. >> brown: but as to filling the hole that we're talking about" those studies -- >> they fill the hole. >> brown: but it depends on where you're at in terms of your income. >> so i think the key is there are tax plans that can fill that hole. jared can write a tax plan that fills that hole and raises taxes and those are the one it is democrats are referring to. >> brown: go ahead. >> first of all, some of what doug just said confused me even more about this because
lawsuits pending that could negate some of the new laws that are intended to require photo ids for voters? >> first observation is, in terms of the case in maryland, that was one misguided example. never should have happened. the race was not that close. it was a huge mistake by that individual and he paid for it with a time in prison. in terms of your concerns about voter i.d., and having to show id, i live in virginia and just got my voter card. they allow any kind of thing, a utility bill, or anything like that. it is a lot easier to vote then to get on an airplane. if you are worried about fraud, i think that these are reasonable requirements. >> in terms of polling, to the extent that both firms can, we try to pull a registered voter list. registered voters who have presumably -- i mean, we try to sample who have not only registered -- people who have not only registered but voted in the last election. >> in a lot of states, they have to have a photo id. how do you account for that? >> our callers asked you to show them your folder id -- your photo i.d. >> not a lot that you can do.
or will we see the cool, constitutional law professor? >> both because to win, because he's competitive he needs to be cool and he knows that. that's one overriding concern presented to him by his advisers. don't freak out. don't get irritated. >> many people support mitt romney on sunday talk shows say he has to be aggressive he has to take to it the president. >> what happens in presidential debates sue have two fundamental goals as a candidate. drive your message and knock your opponent off his. to knock the president off his message, romney campaign knows, governor romney has to be unrelenting. >> romney as an op-ed talking about his view on foreign policy. there seems to be some question within the romney camp as to whether they should even be talking about foreign policy. >> this has been an ongoing debate since the libya crisis and there were, in the immediate hours after that when governor romney stepped into this, we'll prosecute this larger global argument against the president's foreign policy mishandling the arab spring. it's been weeks now until this op-ed appears. it's not ju
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 57 (some duplicates have been removed)